Complex Objects

Pages

Lasting relationships research data archive
Over 20 years, research was conducted at Boston College with the goal of exploring how couples adapt in relationships that last. In-depth interviews were used to explore how partners deal and cope with various aspects of their relationships over the years. Beginning in the early 1990's, the research focused on a diverse sample of heterosexual couples that had been married over 20 years. One hundred forty-four spouses in 72 marriages were interviewed. As the research evolved through the 1990's, 72 same sex partners from 36 lesbian and gay male relationships were added to the study. The final database includes 216 transcribed interviews. The study examines social influences including economic, racial, ethnic, and other cultural variables and areas such as modes of managing conflict and psychological intimacy., 1. Demographic data for individuals with coding for couples. Tab-delimited and SPSS format., 2. Qualitative Data – Includes transcribed interviews for the 216 participants and interview themes. Interview themes are documents created with HyperRESEARCH in Word format with interview extracts based on relations themes such as: Aids; Alcoholism; Change; Circumstances; Commitment; Communication; Conflict; Conflict management; Crises; Decision making; Equity; Family of origin; Feminism; Finances; Homophobia; Initial attraction; Intimacy physical; Intimacy psychological; Intimacy sexual; Marital behavior; Meaning of spouse; Object relations; Parenting; Phases; Problem solving; Racism; Relatedness; Relational evolution; Relational fit; Relational value; Religion; Role expectations; Role models; Roles; Satisfaction; Social support; Therapy; Transitions., ICPSR Category=Q8 (Family and Gender), Coverage unit: Multiple units, Variables: 113, Cross section units: 216, Contact for assistance: datasupport@bc.edu
"Raqqa" ceramics of the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C
Contents: pt. 1. Essay. -- pt. 2. Catalogue of the collection. v. I. 02.190-08.142. v. II. 08.143-47.8., by Jonathan Max Bloom., Thesis (M.A.)--University of Michigan, 1975.
Analysis of anopheline mosquito behavior and identification of vector control targets in the post-genomic era
The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum, the mosquito-borne pathogen that causes human malaria, remains one of the most difficult infectious parasites to combat and control. Campaigns against malaria eradication have succeeded, in most instances, at the level of vector control, rather than from initiatives that have attempted to decrease malaria burden by targeting parasites. The rapid evolution and spread of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes is threatening our ability to combat vectors and control malaria. Therefore, the development, procurement and distribution of new methods of vector control are paramount. Two aspects of vector biology that can be exploited toward these ends are vector behaviors and vector-specific insecticide targets. In this thesis, I describe three aspects of vector biology with potential for the development of improved means of vector control: photopreference behavior, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) targets and epigenetic gene ensemble targets. My studies of photopreference have revealed that specific mosquito species within the genus Anopheles, An. gambiae and An. stephensi, exhibit different photopreference behaviors, and that each gender of mosquito in these species exhibits distinct light-dependent resting behaviors. These inter-specific behavioral differences may be affected by differing numbers of long-wavelength sensing Opsin genes in each species, and my findings regarding species-specific photopreferences suggest that some behavioral interventions may need to be tailored for specific vector mosquito species. Based on the advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies and the generation by others of assembled genomes of many anopheline mosquito species, I have identified a comprehensive set of approximately 3,000 lncRNAs and find that RNA secondary structures are notably conserved within the gambiae species complex. As lncRNAs and epigenetic modifiers cooperate to modulate epigenetic regulation, I have also analyzed the conservation of epigenetic gene ensembles across a number of anopheline species, based on identification of homologous epigenetic ensemble genes in An. gambiae compared to Drosophila melanogaster. Further analyses of these ensembles illustrate that these epigenetic genes are highly stable among many anopheline species, in that I detect only eight gene family expansion or contraction events among 169 epigenetic ensemble genes within a set of 12 anopheline species. My hope is that my findings will enable deeper investigations of many behavioral and epigenetic processes in Anopheles gambiae and other anopheline vector mosquitoes and thereby enable the development of new, more effective means of vector and malaria control.
Analysis of concordance of different haplotype block partitioning algorithms
Background Different classes of haplotype block algorithms exist and the ideal dataset to assess their performance would be to comprehensively re-sequence a large genomic region in a large population. Such data sets are expensive to collect. Alternatively, we performed coalescent simulations to generate haplotypes with a high marker density and compared block partitioning results from diversity based, LD based, and information theoretic algorithms under different values of SNP density and allele frequency. Results We simulated 1000 haplotypes using the standard coalescent for three world populations – European, African American, and East Asian – and applied three classes of block partitioning algorithms – diversity based, LD based, and information theoretic. We assessed algorithm differences in number, size, and coverage of blocks inferred under different conditions of SNP density, allele frequency, and sample size. Each algorithm inferred blocks differing in number, size, and coverage under different density and allele frequency conditions. Different partitions had few if any matching block boundaries. However they still overlapped and a high percentage of total chromosomal region was common to all methods. This percentage was generally higher with a higher density of SNPs and when rarer markers were included. Conclusion A gold standard definition of a haplotype block is difficult to achieve, but collecting haplotypes covered with a high density of SNPs, partitioning them with a variety of block algorithms, and identifying regions common to all methods may be the best way to identify genomic regions that harbor SNP variants that cause disease., Version of record.
Blue sky and tree 1
Title from exhibition catalog.
Boston College tree inventory data archive
From 2008 to 2010 Boston College began a comprehensive inventory of all trees contained within its three campuses: Newton, Chestnut Hill, and Brighton. This project has made use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology and the standard analog tools of forestry. Campus trees are an invaluable resource for ecology students at Boston College. This project is an example of the use of campus assets to create an outdoor campus laboratory for the acquisition of field skills. This student-collected project currently is comprised of an inventory of 5,133 individual trees representing 98 species on the Brighton and Chestnut Hill campuses. Initiated with the primary objective of calculating BC’s carbon footprint, the project goals were expanded to facilitate investigations in plant demography and diversity in advanced ecology electives. The goal of the project was for students to identify the locations of the trees, genus, species, physical descriptions (such as height, diameter, health factors) and possible conflict or risk factors over a period of time. In the original data, variables to the right of the comments field were never available, but were added as columns to be filled in upon further research in future seasons. Two mobile devices were used to collect the data. The original data is organized into two folders containing shapefiles: GPS535, containing the inventory of 4,037 trees; and GPS600, containing the inventory of 1,096 trees. An additional folder with shapefiles, Trees_Merged, was created by Boston College Graduate Statistical Student Ekin Ustun under the direction of ITS, Research Services. Trees_Merged combined the tree inventory from both devices to create one file. Some data cleanup was also implemented under the direction of Kevin Keegan., Data archive project initiated by Colleen Hitchcock and completed in partnership with the Boston College University Libraries. Data actively collected from 2008 through 2010., Includes shapefiles.
COMIT
Coding nucleotide sequences contain myriad functions independent of their encoded protein sequences. We present the COMIT algorithm to detect functional noncoding motifs in coding regions using sequence conservation, explicitly separating nucleotide from amino acid effects. COMIT concurs with diverse experimental datasets, including splicing enhancers, silencers, replication motifs, and microRNA targets, and predicts many novel functional motifs. Intriguingly, COMIT scores are well-correlated to scores uncalibrated for amino acids, suggesting that nucleotide motifs often override peptide-level constraints., Version of record.
CRR 2009 retirement survey data
To see how the recent financial downturn affected workers nearing retirement, the Center for Retirement Research commissioned an Internet survey of 1,317 working Americans between the ages of 45 and 59. This survey was conducted by Knowledge Networks during July and August 2009 using their nationally representative panel. A subsample of 358 individuals who had at least $50,000 in pre-downturn retirement assets and experienced a loss of at least 10%, were asked to respond to four additional questions measuring the effect of financial literacy. The survey addressed a wide range of factors that could influence workers' response to the downturn, including socio-economic, financial, employment, and behavioral characteristics., ICPSR Category=Q8 (Family and Gender), Coverage Unit: Individual, Cross section units: 1,317, Type: Cross-section, Contact for assistance: datasupport@bc.edu, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. 2009. CRR Retirement Survey. Chestnut Hill, MA.
Computation of Potentially Visible Set for Occluded Three-Dimensional Environments
This thesis deals with the problem of visibility culling in interactive three-dimensional environments. Included in this thesis is a discussion surrounding the issues involved in both constructing and rendering three-dimensional environments. A renderer must sort the objects in a three-dimensional scene in order to draw the scene correctly. The Binary Space Partitioning (BSP) algorithm can sort objects in three-dimensional space using a tree based data structure. This thesis introduces the BSP algorithm in its original context before discussing its other uses in three-dimensional rendering algorithms. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is an efficient interactive modeling technique that enables an artist to create complex three-dimensional environments by performing Boolean set operations on convex volumes. After providing a general overview of CSG, this thesis describes an efficient algorithm for computing CSG expression trees via the use of a BSP tree. When rendering a three-dimensional environment, only a subset of objects in the environment is visible to the user. We refer to this subset of objects as the Potentially Visible Set (PVS). This thesis presents an algorithm that divides an environment into a network of convex cellular volumes connected by invisible portal regions. A renderer can then utilize this network of cells and portals to compute a PVS via a depth first traversal of the scene graph in real-time. Finally, this thesis discusses how a simulation engine might exploit this data structure to provide dynamic collision detection against the scene graph.
Copy Number Variation detection from 1000 Genomes project exon capture sequencing data
Background DNA capture technologies combined with high-throughput sequencing now enable cost-effective, deep-coverage, targeted sequencing of complete exomes. This is well suited for SNP discovery and genotyping. However there has been little attention devoted to Copy Number Variation (CNV) detection from exome capture datasets despite the potentially high impact of CNVs in exonic regions on protein function.ResultsAs members of the 1000 Genomes Project analysis effort, we investigated 697 samples in which 931 genes were targeted and sampled with 454 or Illumina paired-end sequencing. We developed a rigorous Bayesian method to detect CNVs in the genes, based on read depth within target regions. Despite substantial variability in read coverage across samples and targeted exons, we were able to identify 107 heterozygous deletions in the dataset. The experimentally determined false discovery rate (FDR) of the cleanest dataset from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is 12.5%. We were able to substantially improve the FDR in a subset of gene deletion candidates that were adjacent to another gene deletion call (17 calls). The estimated sensitivity of our call-set was 45%.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that exonic sequencing datasets, collected both in population based and medical sequencing projects, will be a useful substrate for detecting genic CNV events, particularly deletions. Based on the number of events we found and the sensitivity of the methods in the present dataset, we estimate on average 16 genic heterozygous deletions per individual genome. Our power analysis informs ongoing and future projects about sequencing depth and uniformity of read coverage required for efficient detection., Version of record.
Creative Expression
The Nazis arranged an exhibition of "degenerate" art (Entartete Kunst), shown in Munich in 1937 to insult and degrade artists who are recognized today as some of the most talented artists of the twentieth century. The success of the exhibition affected each artist in a different manner. Many fled Germany and ventured to the United States while others unwilling to leave their homeland suppressed their creative impulses for a life of fear and psychological torture in Germany. The horrific and irreversible effects on the German artists and culture can only be adequately discussed in the context of the time period preceding the exhibition. The movement toward abstraction and expression in art clashed with the rise of Nazi aesthetics to culminate in the exhibition of "degenerate" art. The lives of three artists Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann and Oskar Schlemmer are detailed in this paper.
Cyberlaw
Gerald R. Ferrera ... [et al.]., Includes index., Includes bibliographical references and index., Version of record.

Pages

My Bookmarks

Bookmarks: